Nunnery at Sagaing Hill, Myanmar

I’ve gone back to editing my photos from Myanmar.

This was one of my favourite stops of the trip, a Buddhist nunnery in Sagaing, on the way to Mandalay. The nuns were happy for us to take photographs as they prepared their lunch of rice, fruit and vegetables, all donated to the nunnery.

The nuns worked quietly and moved gracefully. I tried to do the same. I hope I captured at least some of their grace and serenity.

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Myanmar series

I went on a photography tour in Myanmar in 2014. I did intend to post stories about the trip much sooner than I have.

Photography tour

  • The tour was with Cardinal Photo, led by our photographer guides David Cardinal and Ed Reinke. They’ve been going to Myanmar for over a decade and are very knowledgeable. We visited/stayed in Yangon, Bagan, Mandalay, Pindaya and Inle Lake.
  • Cardinal Photo organised this trip with local tour company Tour Mandalay. The tour cost was US$7,695 (including $300 earlybird discount) which included all transfers within Myanmar (we travelled in a private air-conditioned bus and via domestic flights), all meals (including local beer and wine), bottled water while out in the field, our excellent local guide and all park/temple entrance fees. I paid an additional $330 to go hot-air ballooning in Bagan and an extra $1800 single supplement (to have my own room; the base price is for double occupancy). Yes, I could’ve gone to Myanmar for a lot less, but the tour had all the logistics organised with photography as the priority, and took us to places I probably would not have accessed on my own. For me, it was well worth the expense.
  • David was great with answering my various queries via email before I took the plunge and paid my deposit.
  • Info on this year’s upcoming tour is online: Myanmar Photo Tour December 2016
  • I flew to Myanmar via Singapore Airlines (Perth to Singapore) and then Silk Air (Singapore to Yangon).

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  • Craig Hind

    A lovely photo set. It occurred to me that you don’t often see female buddhists. I wondered if that’s just me that has never noticed, but as far as I can remember whenever I have seen buddhists they’ve always been male. I guess they live segregated lives and you more commonly see the men.

    • Thanks, Craig. We did see more monks than nuns while in Myanmar, but I didn’t really think about it at the time. Some years ago, an ex-work colleague quit her job and became a Buddhist nun – a complete change of life.